Our Museums are temporarily closed until further notice.

Bathurst Rail Museum

The Bathurst Rail Museum brings the rich social history of Bathurst and our story as a railway town to life, with personal recollections and interesting artefacts. Explore the stories of local people connected to the Railways, past and present, who have contributed to making Bathurst the thriving city and community it is today.

The completion of the railway between Sydney and Bathurst in 1876 was instrumental to the development of the colony of New South Wales. The Main Western Line was celebrated as a marvel of engineering that opened up trade, transport and communication opportunities for people living inland.

The railway also marked a new social and cultural era for communities in inland NSW. Besides giving working class people access to stable jobs and vocational education, the Railway Institute in Bathurst offered support and leisure activities for railway workers and their families.

The museum is housed in the historic Railway Institute building. Built in stages from 1909, it was the place to be for rail employees and their families to enjoy social gatherings, celebrations, and gain access to important vocational education courses. A fitting home for the Bathurst Rail Museum, the building has been extended to house the museum and a model railway the size of a tennis court. This scale model of the Main West railway during the 1950s and 1960s, displays the Tarana to Bathurst line and is complete with operating trains.

Young children are encouraged to come and explore creative play with one of the world’s largest permanent Brio sets, in our dedicated Kids Central Space.

 

MUSEUM UPDATE

With the confirmation of COVID-19 cases in the Central West, Bathurst Regional Council is following advice on COVID-19 from the state and federal health departments.  Our Museums are temporarily closed until further notice.

For more information click here

HIGHLIGHTS

An experience that will engage and delight people of all ages with stories, interactive exhibitions, educational experiences and diverse public programs.

Stories of local people connected to the Railways. The Bathurst Rail Museum brings the rich social history of Bathurst and its story as a railway town to life with personal recollections, unique artefacts and a journey through the development of the railway in New South Wales.

Be mesmerised by the largest public HO scale model railway in Australia depicting the Great Western Line between Tarana and Bathurst, complete with working locomotives. As the train weaves its way around the layout, stories of the people who worked and travelled on the railway are revealed.

See Models of the No1, first locomotive to run in NSW.

Young ones won’t want to leave Kids Central, an interactive play and learning space with one of the world’s largest permanent BRIO sets. Adults can relax with refreshments from our adjoining café.

Families will enjoy the reading nook and place to take a break, with seating and cafe access.

Purchase a Plaque

Purchase a Plaque
Become part of Bathurst’s Railway Family, purchase a replica brass engine plate with your family name, to be displayed in perpetuity at the Bathurst Rail Museum.

Cost:

Small 120mm x 65mm $250
Large 240mm x 130mm $500
Large plaques also include the opportunity to have 150 words of your family history displayed on the website.

Contact us here if you would like to purchase a plaque.

Read the family history stories here.

 

Relax in style in our historic rail carriage, CBA547. Enjoy a snack from the Refreshment Room Cafe, or have it all to yourself with after hours function hire.

 

Bathurst local, Prime Minister Ben Chifley was an instructor at the Railway Institute building during his time as an engine driver for the railways.

His experience as a member of the railway union was formative to his political success.

He remained a passionate and dedicated member of the Bathurst community during his time as Prime Minister of Australia from 1945-1949.

The Railway Institute building was built in 1909 for training the railway workforce. Over time, it has been a library, billiards room, classroom and social room and has seen many happy gatherings of railway employees and their families. Social activities included choirs, jazz bands, social dances, weddings and games of tennis.